The City of Fort Worth’s official mascot

Livestock Exchange Building
The Livestock Exchange now houses the North Fort Worth Historical Society Museum | Photo by FTWtoday

Who’s the cow behind Cowtown? Today, we’re introducing you to Molly the cowaka the City of Fort Worth’s mascot.

You may recognize the logo [on the left] as Bevo. Sorry UT fans — there’s no correlation between the two. However, in 2002, the city + the UT System entered into an agreement about the use and appearance of Molly. To prove the logos aren’t the same, take a closer look at the color — UT’s logo is Pantone 159 (burnt orange) and Molly’s is Pantone 725 (copper).

The University of Texas vs The City of Fort Worth's logo
The University of Texas vs The City of Fort Worth’s logo. | Graphic by FTWtoday

Origin

In 1909, a longhorn head sculpture was placed on the Livestock Exchange Building to honor the cattle industry. Legend has it that the sculpture was placed there so it could have a vantage point of all the activity in town. It was later given the name “Molly,” which is said to identify with the first longhorn in a herd. 

Molly became the official mascot in 2000. She symbolizes reverence to the past, reflects our city’s Western heritage + promotes a sense of unity and pride.

The history of Cowtown

The nickname “Cowtown” came long before Molly. In 1917, the Fort Worth Stockyards became the largest horse and mule market in the world, welcoming cattle drives and auctions — and plenty of cows and cowboys around town.

Find Molly around town

Livestock Exchange Building | The longhorn sculpture hangs on the front of the building and still watches over the Stockyards.

Molly the Trolley | The vintage-looking trolley is free and travels from the Fort Worth Convention Center to Sundance Square + serves the Trinity Metro’s Central Station.

City Hall | A public art piece presides over the City Council Chambers.

City property | Administration buildings, first responder vehicles, water towers, trash + recycling cans, and signage all bare Molly’s likeness. 

Sundance Square Plaza | A horse mural with an attached waterfall flows into a sculpture of two longhorn heads.